Perspectives

Japanese Artist Handcrafts Candy Animals to Carry on the Tradition of Amezaiku

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Japanese amezaiku artisan Takahiro Yoshihara crafts a menagerie of candy animals by molding, stretching, and cutting hot taffy made primarily from corn syrup. Amezaiku started in Japan as a way to give offerings at temples during the Heian period and became an art practiced by street merchants and storytellers. Yoshihara carries on this storyteller tradition with his rabbit character Amepyon, the mascot for his candy shop in the Sendagi district of Tokyo.

via Is Japan Cool?, The Kids Should See This

Perspectives

Japanese Artist Handcrafts Candy Animals to Carry on the Tradition of Amezaiku

Published by:

Japanese amezaiku artisan Takahiro Yoshihara crafts a menagerie of candy animals by molding, stretching, and cutting hot taffy made primarily from corn syrup. Amezaiku started in Japan as a way to give offerings at temples during the Heian period and became an art practiced by street merchants and storytellers. Yoshihara carries on this storyteller tradition with his rabbit character Amepyon, the mascot for his candy shop in the Sendagi district of Tokyo.

via Is Japan Cool?, The Kids Should See This

Perspectives

‘PBS Idea Channel’ Explores Whether We Live in the Future

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PBS Idea Channel host Mike Rugnetta explores whether we live in the future, er, now. Rugnetta also looks at what our concepts of “The Future” mean for the current time, and whether we’re missing out by documenting and preparing for it.

We spend a lot of time thinking about THE FUTURE. But spoilers, maybe the future is now! Forget hoverboards, flying cars, jetpacks, and structures made of bubbles — the future is here, and your notion of the one you were “promised” was probably a lie. Look around you! Computers the size of pennies, instant communication across the oceans. The Future is now! But why still do we defer to an idea of “The Future”? And what happens to Now when we’re living in the future?

Perspectives

MIT Scientists Train Their Four-Legged Cheetah Robot to Autonomously Sense and Jump Over Hurdles As It Runs

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Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) recently made another remarkable development with their four-legged cheetah robot with the development of an algorithm that allows them to train the cheetah to autonomously sense and jump over hurdles while running, both with and without a harness.

In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.

In September 2014, the cheetah made enormous strides in its development, when it was able to run untethered across a field